The One With Ratios

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We’re onto right triangle trigonometry. This year is flying by (and we’re a few days in at this point).

One of the many tricky things about right triangle trigonometry is that ratios are big. For classes where some kiddos don’t really know how to divide (let alone when it’s written as a fraction) while some (one) roll their eyes because the conceptual trigonometry we’re using has an approximation rather than the actual tangent ratio, the need to differentiate is real.

We took a bit of time today to talk about how to solve ratios. How many kiddos did we actually reach? Unclear, but the first step is important.

It’s fascinating for me to see the 4 papers I used (one per period) to show how to solve an with a variable in the denominator. By the end of the day, I’d realized that writing fewer steps cleanly is more important. I’ve also decided on “one finger if you understand, two fingers if you’d like to hear it again” is a nice way to hear what the class is thinking without being too judgemental (I’m so used to thumbs up/thumbs down, but that feels weighted).

We also did a reading guide where the kiddos used calculators to find the tangent ratio. It’s actually something that I remember relatively vividly from student teaching. I’m feeling a deep appreciation for this unit the third time I teach it.

Photo: 4 iterations of solving the same ratio

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What do you notice? What do you wonder?

The One with Process over Aesthetics

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New unit on exponents, about to be differentiated like whoa.

We started off with a group task (with varying levels of success) about a pyramid scheme. Lots of modeling. Sometimes I wish I’d done more, though frankly the class where I opted to not do modeling got the furthest.

Photo: We made posters. I told them I cared more about their process than their aesthetics. (One kiddo pays the first kiddo on a list $3, then makes 8 of their friends the next kiddo $3. Those 8 kiddos choose 8 friends to pay the next kiddo $3 and so on)2017-02-21-17-40-31-1

What do you notice? What do you wonder?

The One with Tzeltal

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Only fitting to end the Video Project with a video. But I’m too cheap for that WordPress option, so here’s a screenshot.

You can see the kiddo (kind of). You can see the tiles. What you can’t see is the kiddo speaking Tzeltal (an indigenous Mayan language).captura-de-pantalla-2017-02-21-19-02-20What do you observe? What do you wonder?

The One with the Video Project Jobs

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While this blog has helped me to reflect on my work, as well as to keep an archive of sorts, I fear that the thing I will remember most about today’s lesson is that a lot of the kiddos summarized the jobs they had to do for the Video Project instead of just writing their names like we wanted them to. Apparently no amount of mental wishing made this happen. English Language Development for the win (when just plain efficiency would have done).

Photo: Picking roles within the group to ensure that people get to do a range of videos explaining how to solve equations with algebra tiles:2017-01-18-17-35-28What do you notice? What do you wonder?